≡ Menu

Kentucky Estates | Estate and Trust Administration

I often work with "Wealth Creators" who have built substantial wealth themselves, most notably as founders of companies or early-stage employees at startups. I also work with "Inheritors" managing wealth built in prior generations for the benefit of descendants. Although every instance has unique aspects, in general, I find that Wealth Creators have conflicted feelings about what being [...]

During an estate or trust administration, it’s easy to divide and distribute financial assets. Distributing tangible personal property (such as furniture, collections, artwork, jewelry, etc.) can be much harder. Executors, trustees, and beneficiaries are usually very surprised by how little household goods and personal property are worth in an estate administration context. Nonetheless, simply because [...]

Estate administration can be a frustrating experience for families and their advisors, because it's an occasion when families fight. Sometimes the fights are necessary, and unavoidable. Many other times, to a detached observer, the fights seem silly. Whether justified (or not), whether necessary (or not), conflict makes estate administration cost more (even when litigation doesn't [...]

Many clients I work with have done a little bit of research about estate administration before we meet.  Often, they are surprisingly focused on "avoiding probate." This is such a common part of the client mind map that I think it's worth examining myths and realities of avoiding probate in Kentucky. Myth: Probate is expensive, so [...]

It's not uncommon for an old irrevocable trust to no longer fit a family's circumstances, for the simple reason that Yogi Berra was right when he noted that "It's hard to make predictions, especially about the future." Trusts provide advantages, including protection from creditors, divorce, or spendthrift behavior. To obtain these advantages, trusts place restrictions on a beneficiary's access to [...]

Even in an era of relatively high estate tax exemptions, I work with many families who want to use a trust to provide for the management of a child's inheritance. How a son in law or daughter in law should be treated in a parent's estate plan, though, is a more subtle issue that families [...]

The popular financial press is pretty crowded, just like the blogosphere. Yet every once in a while, an article says something pretty simple that's also really important, something that connects strongly with issues we see time and again in our practice. Last week, Howard Gold published that sort of piece on Marketwatch.com: "The biggest retirement [...]

A decade ago, when the estate tax exemption was much lower, the irrevocable life insurance trust (or "ILIT") was a component of many (or even most) tax-aware estate plans. It was common for physicians, attorneys, architects, engineers, and corporate executives to have insurance trusts, without necessarily knowing why that was so. Reassured by their attorneys [...]

Good news, T&E Community, particularly for fiduciaries: 2009 investment advisory fees charged to nongrantor trusts or to estates continue to be fully deductible without regard to the two percent floor under section 67(a) of the Code. IRS Notice 2010-32 extends the interim guidance provided in Notice 2008-116 and Notice 2008-32 regarding investment advisory costs subject to the [...]

KYEstates issued a high-stakes challenge here in our discussion of the taxpayer FLP win in Estate of Petter v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2009-280, 2009 WL 4598137 (U.S. Tax Ct. 2009).  We said: Count not your day a loss: you have now read the phrase glommed onto in a Federal court's opinion.  Find that phrase in another [...]

Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On Linkedin